British Science Festival 2012

It’s that time of year again! We’re off to the British Science Festival this week, and whether you can join us in Aberdeen or not, here’s where you’ll find all the geology news and updates.

Our own flagship event, ‘May the force be with us’ is happening on wednesday 5th at 1pm. But it’s not all about us – here’s a list of our geological highlights of the week. Let us know in the comments if we’ve missed any of yours! And if you can’t be there, we’ll be keeping you up to date here, and on our twitter feed.

Tuesday

11.15 – 12.15 The Halstead Lecture: New frontiers in the continuing search for black gold Regent Building, Regent Lecture Theatre, University of Aberdeen

This year’s title might be a bit of a mouthful, but the Halstead Lecture is always a highlight of the programme – featuring early career researchers chosen for their communication skills. Not to be missed!

12.00 – 1.00 Ancient insects in technicolour: squashing bugs to understand fossil colours King’s College Conference Centre, Auditorium, University of Aberdeen

If oil’s not your thing, we couldn’t resist this for its fabulous title – try a mad dash to make it to them both?

3.30 – 5.30 The future of our polar regions: what must we do and how can science help? Fraser Noble building, Lecture theatre 2, University of Aberdeen

Wednesday

10.00 – 12.00 Our fossil fuelled future Regent Building, Regent lecture theatre, University of Aberdeen

The Palaeontological Association on the past, present and future of fossils and fossil fuels

1.00 – 3.00 May the force be with us: what does the Earth’s magnetic field do for us? Meston Building, Lecture theatre 1, University of Aberdeen

The undisputed highlight of the entire week. Obvs.

3.30 – 5.30 Space weather: a new hazard for a modern world Meston Building, Lecture theatre 1, University of Aberdeen

You don’t even have to leave the room, you lucky geology fans you.

Thursday

11.15 – 12.45 The heat beneath our feet Regent building, Regent lecture theatre, University of Aberdeen

Organised by the British Geological Survey, with a chance to visit a 3D visualisation suite

Friday

12.00 – 1.00 The Charles Lyell Award Lecture: What do dwarf elephants have to do with climate change? King’s College Conference Centre, Auditorium, University of Aberdeen

Victoria Herridge from the Natural History Museum answers the question everyone’s been thinking

3.30 – 5.30 The real doomesday 2012: Cataclysmic events and human extinction Meston Building, Lecture theatre 1, University of Aberdeen

Extinction! Earthquakes! Richard Fortey! This can’t not be good

Saturday

12 – 6 Whisky on the rocks coach pick up is next to the New Library

Saturday is all taken care of courtesy of GSL – we’re whisking (see what we did…?) you away on a fabulous day of geology and whisky, with our blue badge expert geology guide, Steve Cribb.

About sarah

Sarah is our Earth Science Communicator, responsible for media relations, podcasts and other outreach activity.
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4 Responses to British Science Festival 2012

  1. The Palaeontological Association is hosting a session called Our Fossil-Fuelled Future on Wednesday morning: 10-12. It will look at fossil fuels, how palaeontologists make a living, and why fossils still matter.

  2. sarah says:

    Thanks Liam – I’ll add it to the list!

  3. Dave Wilkes says:

    Great to be part of such an amazing event thanks for making along journey worth while,good luck
    Dave Wikes,TITANIC ENGINEERING,

  4. Pingback: The heat beneath our feet | Geological Society of London blog

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